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Drone Laws in Oregon

Summary of Drone Laws in Oregon

Hobbyist Drone Laws For Residents of Oregon and USA

Drone Operations in Oregon are regulated.


  • Hobbyist drone flights are allowed
  • Hobbyist drone pilot license may be required for certain operations.
  • A TRUST Test is required.
  • Hobbyist Drone registration is required for hobbyists flying a drone of more than 0.55 lbs.
  • Drone Remote ID is required for hobbyists, although full implementation is delayed
  • Drone Insurance is not required but recommended for hobbyists’ drone operations

Read below for more details on Hobbyist Drone Laws in Oregon and to find links to regulators and other credible sources!

Commercial Drone Laws For Residents of Oregon and USA

Drone Operations in Oregon are regulated.


  • Commercial drone flights are allowed
  • A commercial drone pilot license is required
  • Commercial Drone registration is required in Oregon
  • Drone Remote ID is required for Commercial Drone Operators. However, full implementation has been delayed
  • Drone Insurance is not required but recommended for commercial drone operations

Read below for more details on Commercial Drone Laws in Oregon and to find links to regulators and other credible sources!

Drone Laws For Foreign Visitors To Oregon (not USA Residents)

Drone Operations in Oregon are regulated.


  • Foreign visitor drone flights are allowed in Oregon
  • Foreign visitor drone pilot license is required
  • Drone registration is required for visitors/tourists
  • Drone Remote ID is required in Oregon for tourists. However, full implementation has been delayed.
  • Drone Insurance is not required but recommended for tourist drone operations

Read below for more details on Drone Laws in Oregon for Visitors (Tourists) and to find links to regulators and other credible sources!

Drone Laws For Government Drone Operators

Drone Operations in Oregon are regulated.


  • Government drone flights are allowed in Oregon
  • Government drone pilot license is required
  • Drone registration is required for Government operations
  • Drone Remote ID is required in Oregon for Government operations. However, full implementation has been delayed.
  • Drone Insurance is not required for Government drone operations

Read below for more details on Drone Laws in Oregon for Government Drone Operations and to find links to regulators and other credible sources!

Agencies Responsible for regulating drones in the State of Oregon

Drone Regulator in the USA: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)

Contact Information

If you need additional details we have not covered or specific case assistance, you can contact the FAA directly at:

  • Address: 800 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20591
  • Phone: 844-FLY-MY-UA (+1 844-359-6982)
  • EmailUAShelp@faa.gov

Please continue reading for more details on USA Drone Laws.

Link To: Oregon Aviation Regulations Chapter 738


UAS Laws – General rules for flying drones in Oregon

Drone operation in the State of Oregon is broadly governed by The Federal USA agency responsible for drone safety, the FAA. Click here for details on FAA USA Drone Laws.

In addition, the Oregon legislature has enacted several supplemental rules specific to Oregon drone operations. The highlights are enumerated below. For more details, click on the links above.

Are drones allowed in Oregon?

Drones are allowed in Oregon for recreational and commercial use, subject to FAA regulations and flight controls established by local governments. Read on for details.

Specific additional drone use laws by the Oregon State legislature

837.310​ ​Restrictions; exceptions.
Except as otherwise provided in ORS 837.310 to 837.345, a law enforcement agency may not operate an unmanned aircraft system, acquire information through the operation of an unmanned aircraft system, or disclose information acquired through the operation of an unmanned aircraft system.

Oregon law enforcement may only use a drone under one or more of the following circumstances: they obtain a written warrant that specifies the period of use of the drone, which cannot exceed 30 days; they reasonably believe that exigent circumstances exist in the commitment of a crime making it unreasonable to wait for a warrant, they have written consent from the individual whose property is being searched, they are using the drone solely for training purposes, or if they intend to use the drone to conduct search and rescue operations during a time of emergency.

837.320​ ​Authorized use upon issuance of a warrant; exigent circumstances.
A law enforcement agency may operate an unmanned aircraft system, acquire information through the operation of an unmanned aircraft system, or disclose information acquired through the operation of an unmanned aircraft system if:

  • A warrant is issued authorizing the use of an unmanned aircraft system or
  • The law enforcement agency has probable cause to believe that a person has committed a crime, is committing a crime, or is about to commit a crime, and exigent circumstances exist that make it unreasonable for the law enforcement agency to obtain a warrant authorizing the use of an unmanned aircraft system.

A warrant authorizing the use of an unmanned aircraft system must specify the period for which the operation of the unmanned aircraft system is authorized. In no event may a warrant provide for the operation of an unmanned aircraft system for a period of more than 30 days. Upon motion and good cause shown, a court may renew a warrant after the expiration of the 30-day period. [2013 c.686 §3; 2015 c.315 §3]

837.330​ Written consent.
A law enforcement agency may operate an unmanned aircraft system to acquire information about an individual or the individual’s property if the individual has given written consent to use an unmanned aircraft system for those purposes. [2013 c.686 §4; 2015 c.315 §4]

837.335​ Search and rescue; use in emergencies.
A law enforcement agency may operate an unmanned aircraft system for the purpose of search and rescue activities, assisting an individual in an emergency, and during a state of emergency that is declared by the Governor.

837.340​ Criminal investigations.
A law enforcement agency may operate an unmanned aircraft system, acquire information through the operation of an unmanned aircraft system, or disclose information acquired through the operation of an unmanned aircraft system for the purpose of reconstruction of a specific crime scene or accident scene, or similar physical assessment, related to a specific criminal investigation.

837.345​ Training.
A law enforcement agency may operate an unmanned aircraft system for training purposes.

837.360​ Restrictions; civil penalties; registration; fees; rules.

  1. A public body may not operate an unmanned aircraft system in the airspace over this state without registering the unmanned aircraft system with the Oregon Department of Aviation.
  2. The Oregon Department of Aviation may impose a civil penalty of up to $10,000 against a public body that violates subsection (1) of this section.
  3. Evidence obtained by a public body through the use of an unmanned aircraft system in violation of subsection (1) of this section is not admissible in any judicial or administrative proceeding and may not be used to establish reasonable suspicion or probable cause to believe that an offense has been committed.
  4. The Oregon Department of Aviation shall establish a registry of unmanned aircraft systems operated by public bodies and may charge a fee sufficient to reimburse the department for the maintenance of the registry.
  5. The Oregon Department of Aviation shall require the following information for registration of an unmanned aircraft system:
    • The name of the public body that owns or operates the unmanned aircraft system.
    • The name and contact information of the individuals who operate the unmanned aircraft system.
    • Identifying information for the unmanned aircraft system as required by the department by rule.
  1. A public body that registers one or more unmanned aircraft systems under this sectionshall provide an annual report to the Oregon Department of Aviation that:
    (a) Summarizes the frequency of use of the unmanned aircraft systems by the public body during the preceding calendar year;
    (b) Summarizes the purposes for which the unmanned aircraft systems have been used by the public body during the preceding calendar year; and
    (c) Indicates how the public can access the policies and procedures established under section 7 of this 2016 Act.
  2. The State Aviation Board may adopt all rules necessary for the registration of unmanned aircraft systems in Oregon that are consistent with federal laws and regulations.
    Section 9 of HB4066 said:
    1. Section 7 of this 2016 Act and the amendments to ORS 837.360 by section 8 of this 2016 Act become operative on January 1, 2017.
    2. A public body may take any action before the operative date specified in subsection (1) of this section that is necessary to enable the public body to exercise, on and after the operative date specified in subsection (1) of this section, all the duties, functions and powers conferred on the public body by section 7 of this 2016 Act and the amendments to ORS 837.360 by section 8 of this 2016 Act.

837.365​ Weaponized unmanned aircraft systems​.
A person may not intentionally, knowingly or recklessly operate or cause to be operated an unmanned aircraft system that is capable of firing a bullet or projectile or otherwise operate or cause to be operated an unmanned aircraft system in a manner that causes the system to function as a dangerous weapon as defined in ORS 161.015

Violations are either a class B or C felony depending on whether the action resulted in the drone causing physical injury to another person.

The rule does not apply if:

  1. The person uses the unmanned aircraft system to release, discharge, propel, or eject a nonlethal projectile for purposes other than to injure or kill persons or animals;
  2. The person uses the unmanned aircraft system for nonrecreational purposes in compliance with specific authorization from the Federal Aviation Administration;
  3. The person notifies the Oregon Department of Aviation, the Oregon State Police, and any other agency that issues a permit or license for the activity requiring the use of the unmanned aircraft system at the time and location at which the person intends to use an unmanned aircraft system that is capable of releasing, discharging, propelling or ejecting a projectile at least five days before the person uses the system;
  4. If the person intends to use an unmanned aircraft system that is capable of releasing, discharging, propelling, or ejecting a projectile in an area open to the public, the person provides reasonable notice to the public of the time and location at which the person intends to use the unmanned aircraft system; and
  5. The person maintains a liability insurance policy in an amount not less than $1 million that covers injury resulting from use of the unmanned aircraft system.

837.370​ Operation over privately owned premises.
Except for the use of an unmanned aircraft system by a law enforcement agency, a person may not operate an unmanned aircraft system over the boundaries of privately owned premises in a manner so as to intentionally, knowingly or recklessly harass or annoy the owner or occupant of the privately owned premises.

837.372​ Operation over critical infrastructure facility.
Except for the federal government, or critical infrastructure owner, or people who are given specific permission, a person commits a Class A violation if the person intentionally or knowingly: Operates an unmanned aircraft system over a critical infrastructure facility at an altitude not higher than 400 feet above ground level; or Allows an unmanned aircraft system to make contact with a critical infrastructure facility, including any person or object on the premises of or within the facility.

837.375​ Interference with an unmanned aircraft system; unauthorized control.
In addition to any other remedies allowed by law, a person who intentionally interferes with, or gains unauthorized control over, an unmanned aircraft system licensed by the Federal Aviation Administration, or operated by the Armed Forces of the United States as defined in ORS 352.313, an agency of the United States or a federal, state or local law enforcement agency, is liable to the owner of the unmanned aircraft system in an amount of not less than $5,000. The court shall award reasonable attorney fees to a prevailing plaintiff in an action under this section.

837.380​ Owners of real property; Attorney General.
Oregon statutes forbid any person from flying a drone over another’s property multiple times, as long as the drone has been flown over the property at least once and the property owner notified the drone operator or owner that they did not want the drone flown over the property. However, the property owner has no cause of action if the drone is taking off or landing, or is lawfully in the flight path of an airport or runway. If the property owner brings a cause of action and prevails, they may recover treble damages and attorneys’ fees.

837.385​ Preemption of local laws regulating unmanned aircraft systems.
Except as expressly authorized by state statute, the authority to regulate the ownership or operation of unmanned aircraft systems is vested solely in the Legislative Assembly. Except as expressly authorized by state statute, a local government, as defined ORS 174.116, may not enact an ordinance or resolution that regulates the ownership or operation of unmanned aircraft systems or otherwise engage in the regulation of the ownership or operation of unmanned aircraft systems.

837.995​ Crimes involving unmanned aircraft systems; penalties.

  1. A person commits a Class A felony if the person possesses or controls an unmanned aircraft system and intentionally causes, or attempts to cause, the unmanned aircraft system to:
    • Fire a bullet or other projectile at an aircraft while the aircraft is in the air;
    • Direct a laser at an aircraft while the aircraft is in the air; or
    • Crash into an aircraft while the aircraft is in the air.
  2. A person who intentionally interferes with, or gains unauthorized control over, an unmanned aircraft system licensed by the Federal Aviation Administration, or operated by the Armed Forces of the United States as defined in ORS 352.313, an agency of the United States or a federal, state or local law enforcement agency, commits a Class C felony.

HB 4066​ Critical Infrastructure Facility

“​Critical infrastructure facility​” means any of the following facilities, if completely enclosed by a fence or other physical barrier that is obviously designed to exclude intruders, or if marked with a sign conspicuously posted on the property that indicates that entry is forbidden:

  • A petroleum or alumina refinery;
  • An electrical power generating facility, substation, switching station or electrical control center;
  • A chemical, polymer or rubber manufacturing facility;
  • A water intake structure, water treatment facility, wastewater treatment plant or pump station;
  • A natural gas compressor station;
  • A liquid natural gas terminal or storage facility;
  • A telecommunications central switching office;
  • A port, railroad switching yard, trucking terminal, or other freight transportation facility; A gas processing plant, including a plant used in the processing, treatment, or fractionation of natural gas;
  • A transmission facility used by a federally licensed radio or television station;
  • A steelmaking facility that uses an electric arc furnace to make steel;
  • A dam that is classified as a high hazard by the Water Resources Department;
  • Any portion of an aboveground oil, gas, or chemical pipeline that is enclosed by a fence or other physical barrier that is obviously designed to exclude intruders; or
  • A correctional facility or law enforcement facility.

A person commits a Class A violation if the person intentionally or knowingly:

  1. Operates an unmanned aircraft system over a critical infrastructure facility at an altitude not higher than 400 feet above ground level or
  2. Allows an unmanned aircraft system to contact a critical infrastructure facility, including any person or object on the premises of or within the facility.

Violations do not apply to:

  1. The federal government.
  2. A public body.
  3. A law enforcement agency.
  4. A person under contract with or otherwise acting under the direction or on behalf of the federal government, a public body, or a law enforcement agency.
  5. An owner or operator of the critical infrastructure facility.
  6. A person with the prior written consent of the owner or operator of the critical infrastructure facility.
  7. The owner or occupant of the property on which the critical infrastructure facility is located.
  8. A person with the prior written consent of the owner or occupant of the property on which the critical infrastructure facility is located.
  9. A person operating an unmanned aircraft system for commercial purposes in compliance with authorization granted by the Federal Aviation Administration.

498.128​ ​Use of drones for the pursuit of wildlife prohibited
The State Fish and Wildlife Commission shall adopt rules prohibiting the use of drones for the following purposes related to the pursuit of wildlife:

  1. Angling;
  2. Hunting;
  3. Trapping;
  4. Aiding angling, hunting, or trapping through the use of drones to harass, track, locate or scout wildlife; and
  5. Interfering in the acts of a person who is lawfully angling, hunting or trapping.

Specific additional UAV laws by local governments within Oregon State

City of Portland | Municipal Law (2007)

Drone and UAV pilots are prohibited from operating in or over any of the city’s parks outside areas designated for recreational flying by the Director.

UAS operation rules in Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Preserves

Oregon Metro Parks | Park Rules (2016)

This 2016 park ordinance banns all drone usage within the set boundaries of Oregon Metro Parks outside officially designated areas. These restrictions also prohibit flying drones under 400ft in the airspace above parklands and water.

Specific additional laws in Jurisdictions within Oregon

Many cities or towns within the state of Oregon may have specific restrictions within their jurisdictions. We recommend checking the local jurisdiction for the latest regulations.

What you must know about Oregon No Fly Zones or No Drone Zones

You need to know if you can operate your drone. Under what limitations? Will you need flight authorizations? And, if so, how do you get those authorizations?

We encourage you to read our explainer. It provides more details here: Explainer – What You Must Know About No Fly Zones or No Drone Zones

How do I check for no-fly zones, no-drone zones, and uncontrolled or controlled airspace in Oregon?

The FAA has partnered with Aloft to develop the B4UFLY mobile app. The app can tell you if there are any airspace restrictions where you want to fly.

If you are looking for a drone no-fly zone map, then B4UFLY is a good place to start.

The app provides situational awareness to recreational flyers and other drone users. You will need airspace authorizations to fly in controlled airspace. This app does not allow you to get airspace authorizations. Authorizations are available through the FAA’s Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC).

The B4UFLY app is available to download for free:

Get the B4UFLY at the App Store for iOS.  https://apps.apple.com/us/app/b4ufly-drone-airspace-safety/id992427109

Get the B4UFLY at the Google Play store for Android.  https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=gov.faa.b4ufly2&hl=en_US&gl=US

B4UFLY is also available as a desktop version for preflight planning and research. https://b4ufly.aloft.ai/ (“B4UFLY App | Federal Aviation Administration”)

How do I get authorization to fly in controlled airspace in Oregon?

The FAA runs Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC). It is the only way to get permission to fly in controlled airspace.

LAANC is available to drone pilots. It applies if you are operating under the Small UAS Rule Part 107. And it applies if you are operating under the exception for Recreational Flyers.

You can get access through one of the FAA-approved LAANC UAS Service Suppliers. Some providers have apps that can be used to apply for approval in near-real time.

There are two ways to use LAANC:

  • Submit a near real-time authorization request for operations. Applies to flights under 400 feet in controlled airspace around airports. This is available to Part 107 Pilots and Recreational Flyers.
  • Submit a “further coordination request.” This applies if you need to fly above the designated altitude ceiling in a UAS Facility Map, up to 400 feet.
  • You can apply up to 90 days before a flight. The approval is coordinated manually through the FAA. This is available to Part 107 pilots only.

LAANC is available at 726 airports. Use the manual process to apply for authorizations for airports not offering LAANC.


Notes for recreational drone pilots flying for fun in Oregon

If you have a small drone of less than 55 pounds, you can fly recreationally by following Drone Laws in the USA defined by 49 USC 44809.

In Oregon, recreational UAS operations (i.e., flying for recreational purposes) are approved under law, specifically 49 USC 44809. Please check the specific state jurisdiction for additional permissions, licensing, or clearance requirements.

Following these rules will keep you and your drone safe. And that helps keep the airspace available to everyone.

All recreational flyers must pass an aeronautical knowledge and safety test. The Recreational UAS Safety Test (TRUST) meets this rule. If law enforcement or FAA personnel ask, you must provide proof of passage. 

TRUST provides education and testing on important safety and regulatory information. If you fly your drone recreationally under the Exception for Recreational Flyers, you must pass the test before you fly. 

Note: If your drone weighs more than .55 pounds (lbs), you must register your drone through the FAA’s Drone Zone.

For a complete discussion on drone registration, see our Drone Registration Explainer.

To fly your drone as a recreational flyer, it’s as easy as 1-2-3

  1. Understand recreational flying requirements.
    • Note: Non-recreational drone use is when you fly drones for business or to help out, not just for fun. For example, real estate agents may use drones to photograph houses they sell. Roof inspectors might use drones to get a closer look at roofs. A high school might have someone fly a drone to record football games and post videos on their website. Doing volunteer work with drones also counts as non-recreational use. So, non-recreational drone use is any time you operate a drone for useful work. Or help others out. It is when you are not just doing it to enjoy flying it for hobby or sport. If you’re unsure which rules apply to your flight, fly under Part 107 (See below).
    • Visit the Recreational Flyers page to learn about the rules for recreational flyers.
    • Download the FAA’s B4UFLY mobile app for more recreational drone flying resources.
  2. Take TRUST
    • You may take the free online test through any FAA-approved test administrators.
    • All FAA-approved TRUST test administrators offer the test free.
    • All test questions are correctable to 100% before issuing your completion certificate.
    • After completing TRUST, you must download, save, or print your completion certificate.
    • If you lose your certificate, you will need to retake TRUST.
    • View a list of TRUST Test Administrators
  3. Receive your certificate
    • After you pass the test, you will receive a certificate. The test administrator you selected gives you your certificate.
    • Test administrators will not keep a record of your certificate. If law enforcement officers ask, you must present a copy of your certificate.

General Rules for Recreational Flyers

USC44809 is the Exception for Limited Recreational Operations of Unmanned Aircraft. The law describes how, when, and where you can fly drones for recreational purposes. Following these rules helps keep people, your drone, and our airspace safe:

  1. Fly only for recreational purposes (personal enjoyment).
  2. Follow the safety guidelines of an FAA-recognized Community-Based Organization (CBO). Read Advisory Circular 91-57C. It provides more information on how to become an FAA-recognized CBO, 
  3. Keep your drone within the visual line of sight. Or use a visual observer who is physically next to you and directly communicating with you.
  4. Give way to and do not interfere with other aircraft.
  5. Fly at or below FAA-authorized altitudes in controlled airspace with prior FAA authorization. Controlled airspace is Class B, C, D, and surface Class E designated for an airport. Get your FAA authorization using LAANC or DroneZone.
  6. Fly at or below 400 feet in Class G (uncontrolled) airspace. Note: Flying drones in restricted airspace is not allowed. Before the flight, drone pilots should always check for airspace restrictions. You can do so on the B4UFLY app or the UAS Facility Maps webpage.
  7. Take The Recreational UAS Safety Test (TRUST) and carry proof of test passage when flying.
  8. Have a current FAA registration. Mark (PDF) your drones on the outside with the registration number. And carry proof of registration when flying. Starting September 16, 2023, registered drones must broadcast Remote ID information. The FAA has delayed enforcement to March 16, 2024.
  9. Do not operate your drone in a manner that endangers the safety of the national airspace system.

Recreational drone pilots must not violate safety requirements. Nor should they operate their drone flight carelessly or recklessly. You could be liable for criminal and/or civil penalties if you do.

You do not need a drone license if your drone use is recreational and falls within the scope of 44809. But, to fly your drone commercially, you must first get a Remote Pilot Certificate (RPC). This is also true for flights under the FAA’s Small UAS Rule (Part 107). The RPC is also known as a drone license or a Part 107 certificate. You may want to get your drone license for the flexibility it allows in your drone flights.

For more details on drone licensing, please see our Drone License Explainer.

It is recommended that recreational drone operators consult the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) rules and regulations on the proper use of recreational drones and use common sense when operating these devices around crowded public areas, wildlife, or historic resources.


Notes for operating Commercial Drone Services in Oregon

If you have a small drone that is less than 55 pounds, you can fly for work or business by following the Drone Laws in the USA defined by FAA Part 107 guidelines.

Commercial drone operations in Oregon are approved under the FAA Part 107. Please check the specific state jurisdiction for additional permissions, licensing, or clearance requirements.

For a complete review of the FAA Part 107 regulation, please see our comprehensive FAA 107 Explainer.

Note: The Operations Over People rule became effective on April 21, 2021. Drone pilots operating under Part 107 may fly at night, over people and moving vehicles without a waiver as long as they meet the requirements defined in the rule. Airspace authorizations are still required for night operations in controlled airspace under 400 feet.

If you have a small drone of fewer than 55 pounds, you can fly for work or business by following the Part 107 guidelines. There are three main steps to fly under Part 107 rules.

Step 1: Learn the Rules

Ensure you understand what is and is not allowed under Part 107 rules.

If you are unsure if Part 107 rules work for you and your intended operation, check our user identification tool.

Some operations will need a waiver. Here are the regulations specified in §107.205 that are subject to waiver:

Learn more about Part 107 Waivers.

Drone operators should avoid flying near airports. It is difficult for crewed aircraft to see and avoid a drone while flying. Remember that the drone operator must avoid manned aircraft. You are responsible for any safety hazard your drone creates in an airport environment.

Step 2: Become an FAA-Certified Drone Pilot by Passing the Knowledge Test

For more details on drone licensing, please see our Drone License Explainer.

To be eligible to get your Remote Pilot Certificate, you must be:

  • At least 16 years old
  • Able to read, write, speak, and understand English
  • Be in a physical and mental condition to safely fly a UAS

Study for the Knowledge Test

Get an FAA Tracking Number (FTN)

Schedule an Appointment

Complete FAA Form 8710-13

Step 3: Register your Drone with the FAA

For a complete discussion on drone registration, see our Drone Registration Explainer.

Registration costs $5 and is valid for three years. You’ll need a credit or debit card and the make and model of your drone handy to register. Learn more about registering your drone.

  • Create an account and register your drone at FAADroneZone. Select “Fly sUAS under Part 107.”
  • Once you’ve registered, mark your drone (PDF) with your registration number. The number will be helpful in case it gets lost or stolen.

Useful published information on flying drones in Oregon

We have partnered with the FAA and other drone enthusiasts in supporting an internet educational campaign called Know Before You Fly. The tips, pointers, and resources apply to Oregon Drone Users also. Please visit the site for additional information: Know Before You Fly


Authoritative Sources of Information on Oregon Drone Laws

We will attempt to keep an updated list of online authoritative links to regulators and other official websites here:



NOTE: This page is about the Regulation of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: Small Unmanned Aerial Systems (SUAS), Small UAS, Remote Piloted Aerial Systems (RPAS), unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), Unmanned Aerial System (UAS), and drone are interchangeable terms unless specified. Model Aircraft, toy, remote-controlled, and RC aircraft may be covered by the same regulations unless specified.


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11 responses to “Drone Laws in Oregon”

  1. max

    There are four CBO recognized by the FAA.
    https://www.faa.gov/uas/recreationalfliers/faa-recognized-community-based-organizations

    The FAA, in 49 USC 44809, says the recreational drone pilot must follow the rules of a CBO. Three of the four recognized CBOs require the pilot to follow all FAA, State and local laws.

    In effect, the FAA has indirectly through those CBOs, told us we have to follow the state an local laws too.

  2. JL Humphrey

    837.372 (3)i Operations over critical infastructure
    has a exemption for FAA 107 pilots with FAA authority

    837.370 Operations over private property.
    This sounds like an attempt to requlate Air Space. Only the FAA can do this. Oregon can restrice “public bodies” but not FAA 107 pilots.

    Oregon can regulate, Take off, Landing and where the controller stands but that would be about it…

    1. Editorial Team

      837.370 regulates operating a flight “in a manner so as to intentionally, knowingly or recklessly harass or annoy the owner or occupant of the privately owned premises.” This is consistent with FAA guidelines. See Part 107 107.23

  3. Ken

    Recently I visited an Oregon State Park in Southern Oregon and flew my recreational drone less that 20 feet for operational test purposes. I was in the air less than 5 minutes when a park volunteer yelled at me saying it was illegal to fly a drone in Oregon State Parks. From my research, these prohibitive rules have yet to be enacted or instituted in all Oregon State Parks. I asked the park volunteer by what authority or rule she was attempting to enforce and she could not answer that question, merely stating she had “heard” there was a rule. She referred me to the head park ranger. In speaking with him, he admitted there were no rules or laws currently in place but that they were using a vague and non-specific conduct park rule concerning the operation of machinery and noise making devices to prohibit the use of drones in the park. Nowhere were there any notification signs or posted regulations stating drone use was prohibited – they were simply relying on park employees to interpret parks rules and applying them as they saw fit.

    I feel recreational use of drones should not be prohibited in Oregon State Parks as often these parks are just the locations that offer some of the best photography. I do think drones can be operated safely and with respect for wildlife and other visitors where they can take off, fly and land in designated areas safely. I have flown my drone from Oregon State Park lands often and the overwhelming majority of fellow visitors have had no issue with the drone. I have yet to hear a negative comment or concern as most are curious and even envious of my ability to acquire great photography of the lands we should all be able to enjoy. Where can I go to voice my objection to overly restrictive rules and probations to recreational drone use?

    1. Merlin at Drone Laws

      Sounds like an overzealous enforcer without actual regulatory prohibition. You should contact your local legislators, and contact the park management to ensure they properly educate the rangers/volunteers

  4. KB

    I have been seeing a large number (10+) of drones just outside the second and third-story windows of our apartment complex at night. I checked with a neighbor who has a patio facing the same direction, and she has witnessed them, too. I’m assuming it is a government agency, due to the regularity of behavior and physical makeup of the models being used. Where can a citizen find out about their privacy rights concerning government use of drones, to educate themselves on their civil liberty rights, and where they can make a complaint, if they are being violated? Perhaps the laws that are presently in place, allow for this kind of behavior; however, it feels like a complete invasion of privacy.

    Thank you for your time.

    1. Merlin at Drone Laws

      You should contact your local law enforcement for concerns about illegal activity, and your local regulators about privacy concerns

  5. Dr. Ronald M. Victor

    Yes, the B4YFly app is totally useless when I am cleared to fly eventhough I’m getting harrassed by residents and law enforcement that the neighbors are concerned of me flying a drone high up in G-airspace (175 ft-200 ft. in the air) above their residents homes. However, planes and helicopters are ok to fly well their homes. This makes flying a drone in almost anywhere of not to offend any homeowners whether its one homeowner in the thick woods or a typical residential area. Or just someone seeing a drone fly high in the sky not liking it and complaining about it.
    No matter what. I am a losing battle of flying my drone in Oregon anywhere even with FAA approval to fly my drone in specific area. Any home owner or not can say I don’t like that drone flying above in the air well of above their property (Height mentioned earlier I typically fly). Please take a look and read the Oregon laws pertaining to drone flying, and please explain or tell me where is it ever possible for me to fly my drone without offending or causing a nuisance with anybody. I just want to enjoy my flying my drone peacefully.

    Thank You,
    A Law Abiding Citizen:
    Dr. Ronald M. Victor

    1. Jonathan Dowell

      Well Said! The whole “person can ask you to not fly over your property if you have flown over once” is complete trash!!! Who lets that pass? That is clearly against FAA regulations and is many court cases against state and local overreach making their way through the system. States are getting a mere slap on the wrist but hopefully they will come to the conclusion that the only government body that can regulate the airspace is the FAA. Thats their job. Nobody owns the airspace above their property. Thats just silly. I am however all for no peeping toms, which would be low, slow, and obviously intruding on livable space definitely should be restricted.

  6. Steve

    The FAA is who makes the rules for the air. So clearly any other laws put in place from the State or local government is overreach, and is illegal. Do you have any idea how hard you make it to fly a drone in your state. The FAA has laws and rules already in place. Learn what they are.

    1. Merlin at Drone Laws

      Steve, thank you for your comment. The reality is that States and other locations have regulations that affect the use of drones. We try with these pages to ensure drone operators know what those are and fly responsibly.

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11 thoughts on “Drone Laws in Oregon”

  1. 837.372 (3)i Operations over critical infastructure
    has a exemption for FAA 107 pilots with FAA authority

    837.370 Operations over private property.
    This sounds like an attempt to requlate Air Space. Only the FAA can do this. Oregon can restrice “public bodies” but not FAA 107 pilots.

    Oregon can regulate, Take off, Landing and where the controller stands but that would be about it…

    Reply
    • 837.370 regulates operating a flight “in a manner so as to intentionally, knowingly or recklessly harass or annoy the owner or occupant of the privately owned premises.” This is consistent with FAA guidelines. See Part 107 107.23

      Reply
  2. Recently I visited an Oregon State Park in Southern Oregon and flew my recreational drone less that 20 feet for operational test purposes. I was in the air less than 5 minutes when a park volunteer yelled at me saying it was illegal to fly a drone in Oregon State Parks. From my research, these prohibitive rules have yet to be enacted or instituted in all Oregon State Parks. I asked the park volunteer by what authority or rule she was attempting to enforce and she could not answer that question, merely stating she had “heard” there was a rule. She referred me to the head park ranger. In speaking with him, he admitted there were no rules or laws currently in place but that they were using a vague and non-specific conduct park rule concerning the operation of machinery and noise making devices to prohibit the use of drones in the park. Nowhere were there any notification signs or posted regulations stating drone use was prohibited – they were simply relying on park employees to interpret parks rules and applying them as they saw fit.

    I feel recreational use of drones should not be prohibited in Oregon State Parks as often these parks are just the locations that offer some of the best photography. I do think drones can be operated safely and with respect for wildlife and other visitors where they can take off, fly and land in designated areas safely. I have flown my drone from Oregon State Park lands often and the overwhelming majority of fellow visitors have had no issue with the drone. I have yet to hear a negative comment or concern as most are curious and even envious of my ability to acquire great photography of the lands we should all be able to enjoy. Where can I go to voice my objection to overly restrictive rules and probations to recreational drone use?

    Reply
    • Sounds like an overzealous enforcer without actual regulatory prohibition. You should contact your local legislators, and contact the park management to ensure they properly educate the rangers/volunteers

      Reply
  3. I have been seeing a large number (10+) of drones just outside the second and third-story windows of our apartment complex at night. I checked with a neighbor who has a patio facing the same direction, and she has witnessed them, too. I’m assuming it is a government agency, due to the regularity of behavior and physical makeup of the models being used. Where can a citizen find out about their privacy rights concerning government use of drones, to educate themselves on their civil liberty rights, and where they can make a complaint, if they are being violated? Perhaps the laws that are presently in place, allow for this kind of behavior; however, it feels like a complete invasion of privacy.

    Thank you for your time.

    Reply
    • You should contact your local law enforcement for concerns about illegal activity, and your local regulators about privacy concerns

      Reply
  4. Yes, the B4YFly app is totally useless when I am cleared to fly eventhough I’m getting harrassed by residents and law enforcement that the neighbors are concerned of me flying a drone high up in G-airspace (175 ft-200 ft. in the air) above their residents homes. However, planes and helicopters are ok to fly well their homes. This makes flying a drone in almost anywhere of not to offend any homeowners whether its one homeowner in the thick woods or a typical residential area. Or just someone seeing a drone fly high in the sky not liking it and complaining about it.
    No matter what. I am a losing battle of flying my drone in Oregon anywhere even with FAA approval to fly my drone in specific area. Any home owner or not can say I don’t like that drone flying above in the air well of above their property (Height mentioned earlier I typically fly). Please take a look and read the Oregon laws pertaining to drone flying, and please explain or tell me where is it ever possible for me to fly my drone without offending or causing a nuisance with anybody. I just want to enjoy my flying my drone peacefully.

    Thank You,
    A Law Abiding Citizen:
    Dr. Ronald M. Victor

    Reply
    • Well Said! The whole “person can ask you to not fly over your property if you have flown over once” is complete trash!!! Who lets that pass? That is clearly against FAA regulations and is many court cases against state and local overreach making their way through the system. States are getting a mere slap on the wrist but hopefully they will come to the conclusion that the only government body that can regulate the airspace is the FAA. Thats their job. Nobody owns the airspace above their property. Thats just silly. I am however all for no peeping toms, which would be low, slow, and obviously intruding on livable space definitely should be restricted.

      Reply
  5. The FAA is who makes the rules for the air. So clearly any other laws put in place from the State or local government is overreach, and is illegal. Do you have any idea how hard you make it to fly a drone in your state. The FAA has laws and rules already in place. Learn what they are.

    Reply
    • Steve, thank you for your comment. The reality is that States and other locations have regulations that affect the use of drones. We try with these pages to ensure drone operators know what those are and fly responsibly.

      Reply

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