Drone Laws in Chile

Agencies Responsible for regulating drones in the Republic of Chile

Dirección General de Aeronáutica Civil (DGAC)


UAS Laws – General rules for flying drones in Chile

The Chilean agency responsible for drone safety, DGAC, has provided several internet-accessible details on flying for fun or work. The highlights are enumerated below. For more details go to the link above.

Are drones allowed in Chile?

According to DGAC, drone use is allowed in Chile, subject to DGAC regulations. Read on for more details.

Here are the most important rules to know for flying a drone in Chile.

  • To fly a drone in Chile, you must register the aircraft and request authorization from the DGAC. 
  • You may only fly one unmanned aerial vehicle at a time. 
  • Never fly at night or in inclement weather. 
  • Avoid flying your drone beyond your line of sight or 500 meters (1,640 feet) from the operator. 
  • Do not fly more than 130 meters above the ground (426 feet). 
  • You must fly at least 20 meters (65 feet) above and 30 meters (98 feet) away from individuals not involved in the drone operation. 
  • Avoid flying over areas where firefighters are working. 
  • Avoid flying within a two-kilometer (1.2-mile) radius of an airport. 
  • Avoid flying over highly sensitive areas such as government or military installations. 
  • Flying is prohibited in Torres del Paine National Park and other areas designated as “no-drone zones.”

Registration

Anyone flying a drone in Chile must obtain a registration card, operating authorization, and RPAS remote pilot credentials from the DGAC.

To register, please contact the DGAC with the following information:

  • Manufacturer and country of origin 
  • The manufacturer’s name, the model, and the serial number 
  • Motorization type 
  • Maximum weight for take-off. 
  • Specifications of integrated technical equipment 
  • Functions of autonomous flight 
  • 10 x 15 cm color photograph of the UAV (jpeg format). 
  • Demonstration of the emergency parachute in action.

After submitting this information, you will receive a registration card, which you should always keep with you when flying. This registration will be valid for 12 months and must be renewed after that.

Licensing

To obtain a DGAC license authorizing you to fly, you must: 

  • Be at least 18 years old. 
  • Submit an affidavit in front of a notary stating that you have received theoretical and practical instruction on the drone model you will fly. 
  • You must pass the written DAN 151, DAN 91, Meteorology, and Aerodynamics exams. Passing requires a minimum of 75% of the candidates. 
  • The credentials will be valid for 12 months before being revalidated.

Penalties

The nature and severity of your infraction will determine the amount and scope of the fine. The judges will also consider whether you committed the violation on purpose and for commercial gain. You could face fines of up to $36,000.

Additional Note For Foreign Operators

If you want to fly an unmanned aircraft, you must obtain a license, complete some training, carry a radio to monitor local air traffic control, and stay away from crowds and buildings. However, if your aircraft weighs less than 750 grams, you can fly in unpopulated areas with permission from the DGAC, Chile’s air traffic control.


Notes for recreational drone pilots flying for fun in Chile

You do not need a drone permit or license to fly in Chile if you intend to stay outside of urban areas and fly a drone weighing less than 750 g (flying 50 m above obstacles).

There are a few rules to follow within Chile’s permitted zones:

  • Fly your drone at a maximum altitude of 130 meters. 
  • Fly your drone during the day and keep it in sight at all times. 
  • Have third-party insurance that is valid in Chile (with a Spanish translation). 
  • Keep at least 30 meters away from people when flying your drone (20 m vertically). 
  • Fly at least 2 kilometers away from airports (1 km for aerodromes), heliports, and prioritize all other types of aircraft. If you see another plane during your flight, you must land immediately. 
  • Pilot a drone outfitted with a lighting system (to be more visible). 
  • Tow or launch any objects from your drone unless you have permission. 
  • Avoid flying your drone over public, military, or critical infrastructure. 
  • Do not fly near a natural disaster or anywhere where emergency personnel will be required to intervene. 
  • have a drone parachute for drones weighing more than 750 g

Notes for operating Commercial Drone Services in Chile

You do not need a drone permit or license to fly in Chile if you intend to stay outside of urban areas and fly a drone weighing less than 750 g (flying 50 m above obstacles).

There are a few rules to follow within Chile’s permitted zones:

  • Fly your drone at a maximum altitude of 130 meters. 
  • Fly your drone during the day and keep it in sight at all times. 
  • Have third-party insurance that is valid in Chile (with a Spanish translation). 
  • Keep at least 30 meters away from people when flying your drone (20 m vertically). 
  • Fly at least 2 kilometers away from airports (1 km for aerodromes), heliports, and prioritize all other types of aircraft. If you see another plane during your flight, you must land immediately. 
  • Pilot a drone outfitted with a lighting system (to be more visible). 
  • Tow or launch any objects from your drone unless you have permission. 
  • Avoid flying your drone over public, military, or critical infrastructure. 
  • Do not fly near a natural disaster or anywhere where emergency personnel will be required to intervene. 
  • have a drone parachute for drones weighing more than 750 g

For commercial flights or 750 g+ drones flying in urban areas, you will need:

  • a license to fly
  • to register your drone
  • ask authorisation systematically

Useful published information on flying drones in Chile

Here is a sample of what you might expect if you follow the drone laws and fly in Chile…

NOTE: Small Unmanned Aerial Systems (SUAS), Small UAS, Remote Piloted Aerial Systems (RPAS), unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), Unmanned Aerial System (UAS), and drone are interchangeable terms unless specified. Model aircraft, toy aircraft, Remote controlled aircraft, and RC aircraft may be covered by the same regulations unless specified.


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Click here to read our Comprehensive Guide For Traveling With A Drone



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IMPORTANT NOTE

The content on this site is collated by volunteers from public general information. This material is not presented as legal advice of any kind, and we cannot guarantee that the information is accurate, complete, or up-to-date. Do not substitute the information you find here for legal advice from a licensed attorney who is authorized to practice in the jurisdiction. When in doubt, contact the local aviation authority responsible for drone safety, utilize a licensed drone service operator, and/or consult a qualified attorney.

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