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Drone Laws in New Jersey

Summary of Drone Laws in New Jersey

Hobbyist Drone Laws For Residents of New Jersey and USA

Drone Operations in New Jersey are regulated.


  • Hobbyist drone flights are allowed
  • Hobbyist drone pilot license may be required for certain operations.
  • A TRUST Test is required.
  • Hobbyist Drone registration is required for hobbyists flying a drone of more than 0.55 lbs.
  • Drone Remote ID is required for hobbyists, although full implementation is delayed
  • Drone Insurance is not required but recommended for hobbyists’ drone operations

Read below for more details on Hobbyist Drone Laws in New Jersey and to find links to regulators and other credible sources!

Commercial Drone Laws For Residents of New Jersey and USA

Drone Operations in New Jersey are regulated.


  • Commercial drone flights are allowed
  • A commercial drone pilot license is required
  • Commercial Drone registration is required in New Jersey
  • Drone Remote ID is required for Commercial Drone Operators. However, full implementation has been delayed
  • Drone Insurance is not required but recommended for commercial drone operations

Read below for more details on Commercial Drone Laws in New Jersey and to find links to regulators and other credible sources!

Drone Laws For Foreign Visitors To New Jersey (not USA Residents)

Drone Operations in New Jersey are regulated.


  • Foreign visitor drone flights are allowed in New Jersey
  • Foreign visitor drone pilot license is required
  • Drone registration is required for visitors/tourists
  • Drone Remote ID is required in New Jersey for tourists. However, full implementation has been delayed.
  • Drone Insurance is not required but recommended for tourist drone operations

Read below for more details on Drone Laws in New Jersey for Visitors (Tourists) and to find links to regulators and other credible sources!

Drone Laws For Government Drone Operators

Drone Operations in New Jersey are regulated.


  • Government drone flights are allowed in New Jersey
  • Government drone pilot license is required
  • Drone registration is required for Government operations
  • Drone Remote ID is required in New Jersey for Government operations. However, full implementation has been delayed.
  • Drone Insurance is not required for Government drone operations

Read below for more details on Drone Laws in New Jersey for Government Drone Operations and to find links to regulators and other credible sources!

Agencies Responsible for regulating drones in the State of New Jersey

Drone Regulator in the USA: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)

Contact Information

If you need additional details we have not covered or specific case assistance, you can contact the FAA directly at:

  • Address: 800 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20591
  • Phone: 844-FLY-MY-UA (+1 844-359-6982)
  • EmailUAShelp@faa.gov

Please continue reading for more details on USA Drone Laws.

Link to: NJ State Assembly – Regulates and prohibits certain operations of drones.


UAS Laws – General rules for flying drones in NJ

Drone operation in New Jersey is broadly governed by The Federal USA agency responsible for drone safety, the FAA. Click here for details on FAA USA Drone Laws.

In addition, the New Jersey State legislature has enacted several supplemental rules specific to NJ drone operations. The highlights are enumerated below.

Are drones allowed in NJ State?

Drones are allowed in NJ State for recreational and commercial use, subject to FAA regulations and flight controls established by local governments. Read on for details.

Specific additional drone use laws by the New Jersey State legislature

Senate Bill SB 3370 (2017)

  • Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) operations are permitted consistent with federal law.
  • UAS owners or operators of critical infrastructure may apply to the FAA to prohibit or restrict the operation of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) near their critical infrastructure.
  • Operating a UAV in a way that endangers the life or property of another is a disorderly person offense.
  • It is a crime if you “knowingly or intentionally creates or maintains a condition which endangers the safety or security of a correctional facility by operating an unmanned aircraft system on the premises of or in close proximity to that facility.”
  • Operating a UAV that interferes with a first responder is a crime.
  • Operating a UAS under the influence of drugs or with a BAC of .08 percent is a disorderly person offense.
  • Keeps local governments from regulating UAS in any way that is inconsistent with the NJ State and federal law.

Specific additional NJ Drone laws (by local governments within New Jersey)

East Bay Regional Parks | Municipal Ordinance (2016)

This ordinance prohibits unmanned aircraft systems (UAV) from flying closer than 500ft above any of East Bay’s District parklands, as stated by Federal Regulations.

Borough of Franklin Lakes | Municipal Ordinance (2016)

Prohibits all drones from flying below 400ft in the Borough for the following situations:

  • Private property (unless permitted by the owner)
  • All streets, including side streets and alleys,
  • All borough buildings and structures without prior permission
  • Between sunrise (dawn) and sunset (dusk)
  • Over persons not directly involved with controlling the UAV

Long Beach Township |Township Code (2015)

This ordinance bans all drone operations, including take-offs and landings, in the township. It also prohibits flying in airspace below 400ft ground level and township structures.

Middlesex County | County Parks Ordinance

This ordinance bans drone operations from all non-designated areas in Middlesex County parks. Designated areas are publicly displayed under the authority of Middlesex’s Director of County Parks & Recreation.

No person shall operate radio-controlled flying devices such as, but not limited to, remotely piloted aircraft, model airplanes, or drones without a written permit. Persons who obtain a written permit may only operate such devices at designated locations and times. Persons operating such flying devices shall adhere to the regulations hereby contained in Appendix C.

Palisades Interstate Park Commission | Park Ordinance (2019)

This park ordinance bans drones and all other radio-controlled aircraft from flying within all commission-owned/managed parks and property.

The city of Ventnor | Municipal Ordinance (2016)

This ordinance bans drones from take-offs and landings on all government and public buildings. Moreover, UAS operators cannot fly under 400ft around the above structures. The ordinance also prohibits flying UAS in all city-run parks. The exceptions are for those with prior written permission, usually granted for special events from the Ventnor City Chief of Police.

Wayne Township |Township Code (1989)

This ordinance bans all UAV operations from Wayne Township parks outside of designated areas.

UAS operation rules in Parks, Recreation and Cultural Preserves

NJ State Park Service Policy (2015)

This NJ policy bans drone operations from all state-managed lands and waters that don’t have prior approval. Operators must submit applications to fly from the above to the Assistant Director (State Park Service) in accordance with N.J.A.C 7:2-1.4(b).

Specific additional NJ Drone Laws (in Jurisdictions within New Jersey)

Many cities or towns within New Jersey may have specific restrictions within their jurisdictions. We recommend checking the local jurisdiction for the latest regulations.

What you must know about New Jersey No Fly Zones or No Drone Zones

You need to know if you can operate your drone. Under what limitations? Will you need flight authorizations? And, if so, how do you get those authorizations?

We encourage you to read our explainer. It provides more details here: Explainer – What You Must Know About No Fly Zones or No Drone Zones

How do I check for no-fly zones, no-drone zones, and uncontrolled or controlled airspace in New Jersey?

The FAA has partnered with Aloft to develop the B4UFLY mobile app. The app can tell you if there are any airspace restrictions where you want to fly.

If you are looking for a drone no-fly zone map, then B4UFLY is a good place to start.

The app provides situational awareness to recreational flyers and other drone users. You will need airspace authorizations to fly in controlled airspace. This app does not allow you to get airspace authorizations. Authorizations are available through the FAA’s Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC).

The B4UFLY app is available to download for free:

Get the B4UFLY at the App Store for iOS.  https://apps.apple.com/us/app/b4ufly-drone-airspace-safety/id992427109

Get the B4UFLY at the Google Play store for Android.  https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=gov.faa.b4ufly2&hl=en_US&gl=US

B4UFLY is also available as a desktop version for preflight planning and research. https://b4ufly.aloft.ai/ (“B4UFLY App | Federal Aviation Administration”)

How do I get authorization to fly in controlled airspace in New Jersey?

The FAA runs Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC). It is the only way to get permission to fly in controlled airspace.

LAANC is available to drone pilots. It applies if you are operating under the Small UAS Rule Part 107. And it applies if you are operating under the exception for Recreational Flyers.

You can get access through one of the FAA-approved LAANC UAS Service Suppliers. Some providers have apps that can be used to apply for approval in near-real time.

There are two ways to use LAANC:

  • Submit a near real-time authorization request for operations. Applies to flights under 400 feet in controlled airspace around airports. This is available to Part 107 Pilots and Recreational Flyers.
  • Submit a “further coordination request.” This applies if you need to fly above the designated altitude ceiling in a UAS Facility Map, up to 400 feet.
  • You can apply up to 90 days before a flight. The approval is coordinated manually through the FAA. This is available to Part 107 pilots only.

LAANC is available at 726 airports. Use the manual process to apply for authorizations for airports not offering LAANC.


Notes for recreational drone pilots flying for fun in New Jersey

If you have a small drone of less than 55 pounds, you can fly recreationally by following Drone Laws in the USA defined by 49 USC 44809.

In New Jersey, recreational UAS operations (i.e., flying for recreational purposes) are approved under law, specifically 49 USC 44809. Please check the specific state jurisdiction for additional permissions, licensing, or clearance requirements.

Following these rules will keep you and your drone safe. And that helps keep the airspace available to everyone.

All recreational flyers must pass an aeronautical knowledge and safety test. The Recreational UAS Safety Test (TRUST) meets this rule. If law enforcement or FAA personnel ask, you must provide proof of passage. 

TRUST provides education and testing on important safety and regulatory information. If you fly your drone recreationally under the Exception for Recreational Flyers, you must pass the test before you fly. 

Note: If your drone weighs more than .55 pounds (lbs), you must register your drone through the FAA’s Drone Zone.

For a complete discussion on drone registration, see our Drone Registration Explainer.

To fly your drone as a recreational flyer, it’s as easy as 1-2-3

  1. Understand recreational flying requirements.
    • Note: Non-recreational drone use is when you fly drones for business or to help out, not just for fun. For example, real estate agents may use drones to photograph houses they sell. Roof inspectors might use drones to get a closer look at roofs. A high school might have someone fly a drone to record football games and post videos on their website. Doing volunteer work with drones also counts as non-recreational use. So, non-recreational drone use is any time you operate a drone for useful work. Or help others out. It is when you are not just doing it to enjoy flying it for hobby or sport. If you’re unsure which rules apply to your flight, fly under Part 107 (See below).
    • Visit the Recreational Flyers page to learn about the rules for recreational flyers.
    • Download the FAA’s B4UFLY mobile app for more recreational drone flying resources.
  2. Take TRUST
    • You may take the free online test through any FAA-approved test administrators.
    • All FAA-approved TRUST test administrators offer the test free.
    • All test questions are correctable to 100% before issuing your completion certificate.
    • After completing TRUST, you must download, save, or print your completion certificate.
    • If you lose your certificate, you will need to retake TRUST.
    • View a list of TRUST Test Administrators
  3. Receive your certificate
    • After you pass the test, you will receive a certificate. The test administrator you selected gives you your certificate.
    • Test administrators will not keep a record of your certificate. If law enforcement officers ask, you must present a copy of your certificate.

General Rules for Recreational Flyers

USC44809 is the Exception for Limited Recreational Operations of Unmanned Aircraft. The law describes how, when, and where you can fly drones for recreational purposes. Following these rules helps keep people, your drone, and our airspace safe:

  1. Fly only for recreational purposes (personal enjoyment).
  2. Follow the safety guidelines of an FAA-recognized Community-Based Organization (CBO). Read Advisory Circular 91-57C. It provides more information on how to become an FAA-recognized CBO, 
  3. Keep your drone within the visual line of sight. Or use a visual observer who is physically next to you and directly communicating with you.
  4. Give way to and do not interfere with other aircraft.
  5. Fly at or below FAA-authorized altitudes in controlled airspace with prior FAA authorization. Controlled airspace is Class B, C, D, and surface Class E designated for an airport. Get your FAA authorization using LAANC or DroneZone.
  6. Fly at or below 400 feet in Class G (uncontrolled) airspace. Note: Flying drones in restricted airspace is not allowed. Before the flight, drone pilots should always check for airspace restrictions. You can do so on the B4UFLY app or the UAS Facility Maps webpage.
  7. Take The Recreational UAS Safety Test (TRUST) and carry proof of test passage when flying.
  8. Have a current FAA registration. Mark (PDF) your drones on the outside with the registration number. And carry proof of registration when flying. Starting September 16, 2023, registered drones must broadcast Remote ID information. The FAA has delayed enforcement to March 16, 2024.
  9. Do not operate your drone in a manner that endangers the safety of the national airspace system.

Recreational drone pilots must not violate safety requirements. Nor should they operate their drone flight carelessly or recklessly. You could be liable for criminal and/or civil penalties if you do.

You do not need a drone license if your drone use is recreational and falls within the scope of 44809. But, to fly your drone commercially, you must first get a Remote Pilot Certificate (RPC). This is also true for flights under the FAA’s Small UAS Rule (Part 107). The RPC is also known as a drone license or a Part 107 certificate. You may want to get your drone license for the flexibility it allows in your drone flights.

For more details on drone licensing, please see our Drone License Explainer.

Hobbyist rules by Division of Parks and Forestry

The operation of a UAV is hereby specifically prohibited within all lands and waters administered by the State Park Service unless specifically approved by the Assistant Director, State Park Service. Accredited Universities may also request permission for the scheduled operation of a UAV for scientific research projects with a letter signed by the course instructor on official college letterhead. Requests must be made ninety (90) days prior to the intended date of use through a Special Use Permit (SUP), which can be coordinated through the park office. The Superintendent shall outline the safety zone within which only the persons associated with the UAV may be permitted.

All requests to launch, land, or operate a UAV on lands or waters administered by the State Park Service will be adequately evaluated as to the appropriateness of the requested activities and whether the use of a UAV will result in unacceptable impacts to park resources and visitors.

For more details see the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Parks and Forestry, State Park Service Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Policy


Notes for operating Commercial Drone Services in New Jersey

If you have a small unmanned aircraft that is less than 55 pounds, you can fly for work or business by following the Drone Laws in the USA defined by FAA Part 107 guidelines.

Commercial drone operations in NJ State are approved under the FAA Part 107. Please check the specific state jurisdiction for additional permissions, licensing, or clearance requirements.

For a complete review of the FAA Part 107 regulation, please see our comprehensive FAA 107 Explainer.

Note: The Operations Over People rule became effective on April 21, 2021. Drone pilots operating under Part 107 may fly at night, over people and moving vehicles without a waiver as long as they meet the requirements defined in the rule. Airspace authorizations are still required for night operations in controlled airspace under 400 feet.

If you have a small drone of fewer than 55 pounds, you can fly for work or business by following the Part 107 guidelines. There are three main steps to fly under Part 107 rules.

Step 1: Learn the Rules

Ensure you understand what is and is not allowed under Part 107 rules.

If you are unsure if Part 107 rules work for you and your intended operation, check our user identification tool.

Some operations will need a waiver. Here are the regulations specified in §107.205 that are subject to waiver:

Learn more about Part 107 Waivers.

Drone operators should avoid flying near airports. It is difficult for crewed aircraft to see and avoid a drone while flying. Remember that the drone operator must avoid manned aircraft. You are responsible for any safety hazard your drone creates in an airport environment.

Step 2: Become an FAA-Certified Drone Pilot by Passing the Knowledge Test

For more details on drone licensing, please see our Drone License Explainer.

To be eligible to get your Remote Pilot Certificate, you must be:

  • At least 16 years old
  • Able to read, write, speak, and understand English
  • Be in a physical and mental condition to safely fly a UAS

Study for the Knowledge Test

Get an FAA Tracking Number (FTN)

Schedule an Appointment

Complete FAA Form 8710-13

Step 3: Register your Drone with the FAA

For a complete discussion on drone registration, see our Drone Registration Explainer.

Registration costs $5 and is valid for three years. You’ll need a credit or debit card and the make and model of your drone handy to register. Learn more about registering your drone.

  • Create an account and register your drone at FAADroneZone. Select “Fly sUAS under Part 107.”
  • Once you’ve registered, mark your drone (PDF) with your registration number. The number will be helpful in case it gets lost or stolen.

Commercial rules by Division of Parks and Forestry

The operation of a UAV for commercial purposes is hereby specifically prohibited within all lands and waters administered by the State Park Service unless specifically approved by the Assistant Director, State Park Service.

Accredited Universities may also request permission for the scheduled operation of a UAS for scientific research projects with a letter signed by the course instructor on the official college letterhead. Requests must be made ninety (90) days prior to the intended date of use through a Special Use Permit (SUP), which can be coordinated through the park office. The Superintendent shall outline the safety zone within which only the persons associated with the UAV may be permitted.

All requests to launch, land, or operate a UAV on lands or waters administered by the State Park Service will be adequately evaluated as to the appropriateness of the requested activities and whether the use of a UAV will result in unacceptable impacts to park resources and visitors.

For more details see the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Parks and Forestry, State Park Service Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Policy


Useful published information on flying drones in NJ

We have partnered with the FAA and other drone enthusiasts in supporting an internet educational campaign called Know Before You Fly. The tips, pointers, and resources apply to NJ State Drone Users also. Please visit the site for additional information: Know Before You Fly


Authoritative Sources of Information on New Jersey Drone Laws

We will attempt to keep an updated list of online authoritative links to regulators and other official websites here:



NOTE: This page is about the Regulation of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles: Small Unmanned Aerial Systems (SUAS), Small UAS, Remote Piloted Aerial Systems (RPAS), unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), Unmanned Aerial System (UAS), and drone are interchangeable terms unless specified. Model Aircraft, toy, remote-controlled, and RC aircraft may be covered by the same regulations unless specified.


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9 responses to “Drone Laws in New Jersey”

  1. Jason Miklowcic

    This is a mess. First of all . In Nj any municipal/county law or ord is nullified by NJ preemption law regarding Uas 2C 40-29 . Only the state can create laws regulating the operation of drones. Secondly, only the faa can regulate airspace. If you are going to list the laws please also make pilots aware of their rights.

    1. Editorial Team

      Jason, Thank you for your comment. We want to point out the laws on the books, we don’t take a position on which prevails in any given situation. There are certainly some differences between municipalities/State/FAA position on the use of the airspace. A pilot should be aware of these and get appropriate legal guidance when you disagree.

  2. Droneup

    I don’t see how the state of NJ has any authorization to mandate where a drone can or cannot fly without coordinating with the FAA. The FAA, per a congressional mandate, regulates the airspace in the USA, not states. If the state, county or township coordinates any restrictions they seek with the FAA, these restrictions can be put on the “B4UFLY app utilized by drone pilots. Again, sUAS (drones) are considered aircraft and cannot be regulated by states, counties or townships.

    1. Merlin at Drone Laws

      We are not taking a position on the legality of local regulations, merely reporting them and advising operators to fly safely and within the regulations.

      1. Droneup

        This creates a major problem, for which some drone operators have suffered the consequences! States and municipalities creating laws that they have no authorization to do. Local police follow the ordinances of their respective towns, thinking these laws were passed correctly, which they are not. This opens towns up to unnecessary law suits. There have already been cases of individuals flying safely and within the rules of FAA Part 107 that have been given tickets by local/state police. As far as state regulations, if they are not coordinated with the Federal Government, they hold no weight and are non-binding.

        1. Merlin at Drone Laws

          We understand there are pros/cons on both sides of this issue. You just need to read through some of the comments we receive from citizens that a re upset with their privacy being clearly violated, and operators who are unfairly hassled. On this site, we are not advocates for any position other than safe drone operations for the benefit of all.

          This will get decided by the regulators, and we will inform as those decisions are made.

  3. Warren

    As retired seniors with hearing disabilities, we walk at Monksville Reservoir for exercise that is beautiful and quiet.
    (The open damn is flat, breezy, and almost bug free.)

    We have seen local families enjoy the view and birds.

    We do not believe drones should be flown there for following reasons:

    Believe only allowed in designated locations like Garrett mountain.
    1. Over Reservoir water for thousands of taxpaying families needs
    2. Over boaters
    3. Near powerlines
    4. Noise pollution
    5. Litter from spectators who fish from damn. Most likely without fishing permits…right near the small sign saying no fishing!

    Signage needs to be
    Clearly posted for the sake of preserving this natural treasure.

    Note: frequently seen at dusk

    Thank you in advance.

    1. Merlin at Drone Laws

      Thank you for your comment Warren. You can contact the local Parks organization and request they place the Reservoir on a do not fly list.

    2. chris

      Hello Warren,
      I just have read your post/reply on : “Thoughts on Drone Laws In N.J.” and I thank you for your interest in Drones & Drone safety. I also have similar interests and am in the process of forming a none for profit organization to help under privileged children and handicapped persons to enjoy our state and its resources , including enjoying our state & federal parks and the new hobby of Drone Flying. As it is – to purchase a personal drone is relatively inexpensive … to most of us. That said , for many people its not. I see that you indicated that you are hearing impaired , and i was wondering if, because the hearing condition you feel unsafe with drones operating in the vicinity of where you take your walks. ? … (( I would understand such a fear of not being able to here a drone near you – I also am physically challenged but could not imagine not being able to hear and may god bless you)) … I also would like to know your concern of a predator such as a bear or bobcat stalking you or others during walks/visits in a state park or not. I mean no disrespect to you or others by making the above possible nexus . My question presented to you is : Would you be less concerned of harm to persons or park ecosystems if any operations of drones were conducted with the help, overseeing and management of State Certified Professional Unmanned Drone Operators ? Lastly Could you please tell me your concerns of any drone operations doing harm to the parks or its inhabitants . I sincerely THANK YOU for both your post and also in advance to your kind anticipated reply to mine = C.Green

Leave a Comment

9 thoughts on “Drone Laws in New Jersey”

  1. This is a mess. First of all . In Nj any municipal/county law or ord is nullified by NJ preemption law regarding Uas 2C 40-29 . Only the state can create laws regulating the operation of drones. Secondly, only the faa can regulate airspace. If you are going to list the laws please also make pilots aware of their rights.

    Reply
    • Jason, Thank you for your comment. We want to point out the laws on the books, we don’t take a position on which prevails in any given situation. There are certainly some differences between municipalities/State/FAA position on the use of the airspace. A pilot should be aware of these and get appropriate legal guidance when you disagree.

      Reply
  2. I don’t see how the state of NJ has any authorization to mandate where a drone can or cannot fly without coordinating with the FAA. The FAA, per a congressional mandate, regulates the airspace in the USA, not states. If the state, county or township coordinates any restrictions they seek with the FAA, these restrictions can be put on the “B4UFLY app utilized by drone pilots. Again, sUAS (drones) are considered aircraft and cannot be regulated by states, counties or townships.

    Reply
    • We are not taking a position on the legality of local regulations, merely reporting them and advising operators to fly safely and within the regulations.

      Reply
      • This creates a major problem, for which some drone operators have suffered the consequences! States and municipalities creating laws that they have no authorization to do. Local police follow the ordinances of their respective towns, thinking these laws were passed correctly, which they are not. This opens towns up to unnecessary law suits. There have already been cases of individuals flying safely and within the rules of FAA Part 107 that have been given tickets by local/state police. As far as state regulations, if they are not coordinated with the Federal Government, they hold no weight and are non-binding.

        Reply
        • We understand there are pros/cons on both sides of this issue. You just need to read through some of the comments we receive from citizens that a re upset with their privacy being clearly violated, and operators who are unfairly hassled. On this site, we are not advocates for any position other than safe drone operations for the benefit of all.

          This will get decided by the regulators, and we will inform as those decisions are made.

          Reply
  3. As retired seniors with hearing disabilities, we walk at Monksville Reservoir for exercise that is beautiful and quiet.
    (The open damn is flat, breezy, and almost bug free.)

    We have seen local families enjoy the view and birds.

    We do not believe drones should be flown there for following reasons:

    Believe only allowed in designated locations like Garrett mountain.
    1. Over Reservoir water for thousands of taxpaying families needs
    2. Over boaters
    3. Near powerlines
    4. Noise pollution
    5. Litter from spectators who fish from damn. Most likely without fishing permits…right near the small sign saying no fishing!

    Signage needs to be
    Clearly posted for the sake of preserving this natural treasure.

    Note: frequently seen at dusk

    Thank you in advance.

    Reply
    • Thank you for your comment Warren. You can contact the local Parks organization and request they place the Reservoir on a do not fly list.

      Reply
    • Hello Warren,
      I just have read your post/reply on : “Thoughts on Drone Laws In N.J.” and I thank you for your interest in Drones & Drone safety. I also have similar interests and am in the process of forming a none for profit organization to help under privileged children and handicapped persons to enjoy our state and its resources , including enjoying our state & federal parks and the new hobby of Drone Flying. As it is – to purchase a personal drone is relatively inexpensive … to most of us. That said , for many people its not. I see that you indicated that you are hearing impaired , and i was wondering if, because the hearing condition you feel unsafe with drones operating in the vicinity of where you take your walks. ? … (( I would understand such a fear of not being able to here a drone near you – I also am physically challenged but could not imagine not being able to hear and may god bless you)) … I also would like to know your concern of a predator such as a bear or bobcat stalking you or others during walks/visits in a state park or not. I mean no disrespect to you or others by making the above possible nexus . My question presented to you is : Would you be less concerned of harm to persons or park ecosystems if any operations of drones were conducted with the help, overseeing and management of State Certified Professional Unmanned Drone Operators ? Lastly Could you please tell me your concerns of any drone operations doing harm to the parks or its inhabitants . I sincerely THANK YOU for both your post and also in advance to your kind anticipated reply to mine = C.Green

      Reply

Leave a Comment